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Tag: ForGod'sSake

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For God’s Sake: Every day is a day for giving thanks

As a Canadian – or as the Bible refers to me, “the alien in your midst” – I still think of the second Monday in October as Thanksgiving Day. In many U.S. states, that day is Columbus Day, and in others, Indigenous Peoples Day.

Whatever you choose to call that day, one fact remains, I am not getting any turkey.

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For God’s Sake: We will never be sinless this side of heaven, but we can sin less

A group of men from Compass Church and I have begun meeting weekly to study the book “Disciplines of a Godly Man” by R. Kent Hughes.

This excellent book is founded on the command in the Bible for Christians to “discipline” themselves for godliness. The author begins by highlighting famous, successful men, who made their craft look easy.

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For God’s Sake: Marriage is glorious gift of God we cherish

My idea of an enjoyable morning is sipping coffee with my wife at a café and watching the world pass by. Our favorite perch when we lived in Naples was a bagel shop in a very busy plaza.

On Friday mornings, we’d seat ourselves at a table facing the small, very full, parking lot to watch the clumsy ballet of cars attempting to enter and exit.

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For God’s Sake: Christian life is a team sport

One word that I would never use to describe myself is “athletic.” I played baseball in a municipal league in my youth, but I hung up my cleats and became a musician.

So, it was strange that, some 20 years later, I would be standing on a basketball half-court, about to go three-on-three against teenagers half my age. I have no recollection of how that absurdity came to be.

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For God’s Sake: Wearing a cross is easy; bearing it is another matter

I met Rev. Williams through his son, who served on a church staff with me. It was early in my ministry. He was near the end of life, his mind ravaged by dementia, living in a care facility. Sometimes when I visited him, he was lucid; often he was not.

Every Wednesday, his son would bring him to the church to have lunch with the staff. The staff’s lunch conversations were lively affairs, sometimes humorous, sometimes serious.

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