Five Things to Know in Florida for Jan. 27

FLORIDA AIRPORT SHOOTING SUSPECT INDICTED ON 22 COUNTS

The indictment returned Thursday charges 26-year-old Esteban Santiago with 11 counts of causing death or bodily harm at an international airport, five counts of causing death during a crime of violence and six counts of using a firearm during a crime of violence. Santiago could face the death penalty if convicted in the Jan. 6 shooting at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

SUSPECT IN ORLANDO OFFICER’S DEATH WILL ACT AS OWN LAWYER

Markeith Loyd made the decision in court on Thursday despite repeated warnings from a judge that it’s a bad idea. Judge Frederick Lauten warned Loyd that it’s almost always unwise to represent oneself, and said Loyd would have only limited legal resources available while awaiting his trial in jail on no bond. However, the judge said Loyd appeared competent to make that decision.

FIREFIGHTER RECOVERING AFTER UNDERGROUND RESCUE ATTEMPT

Key Largo firefighter Leonardo Moreno was released late last week. Officials say Moreno tried to help a man who collapsed Jan. 16 inside a drainage hole in Key Largo. Three workers for a Monroe County contractor died at the scene. Authorities said Moreno descended into the hole filled with poisonous gases without additional breathing equipment.

FLORIDA PORT BACKS OUT OF AGREEMENT WITH CUBAN GOVERNMENT AFTER THREAT FROM GOVERNOR

Port Everglades issued a statement Thursday that the National Port Administration of Cuba says no agreement is currently needed. The Fort Lauderdale-area port and the Port of Palm Beach are meeting with Cuban officials this week. Gov. Rick Scott threatened to cut state funding to the port on Wednesday.

FLORIDA: 520 MANATEE DEATHS IN 2016, WITH 104 DUE TO BOATS

According to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission data released Thursday, cold stress killed 23 of the protected sea cows in 2016. Eighty-eight manatees died of natural causes, while 150 deaths remained undetermined. Surveys last February counted 6,250 manatees, the most since those counts started in 1991.

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