Five Things to Know in Florida for Dec. 21

FAMILIES OF PULSE SHOOTING VICTIMS SUE SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORKS

Families of three patrons killed in the Orlando nightclub massacre sued Facebook, Google and Twitter, claiming the gunman who killed their loved ones was radicalized through propaganda found through social media. The families of Tevin Crosby, Juan Ramon Guerrero Jr. and Javier Jorge-Reyes filed the lawsuit Monday in federal court in Michigan. They are seeking an unnamed amount of money under a federal law that allows the estates of victims of terrorist attacks to sue anybody who provided “material support” to the terrorists.

FLORIDA IS STILL GROWING FAST

Florida is one of the nation’s fastest-growing states. New figures released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau show that Florida’s population grew by 1.8 percent in the last year. Only Utah and Nevada grew at faster rates, about 2 percent.

POLICE SAY UBER DRIVER ACTED IN SELF DEFENSE IN SHOOTING

Authorities say a South Florida Uber driver acted in self-defense when he fatally shot a would-be robber. Aventura police spokesman Chris Goranitis says the driver was taking a passenger to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport early Sunday when a van driven by 24-year-old Kevin DeVincent Johnson cut him off. Johnson got out of the van with a gun in each hand and confronted Namique Anderson.

PEMBROKE PINES MAN IS A HERO

The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, based in Pittsburgh, announced the winners Tuesday, and a South Florida man is on the list. William E. Ramirez, 46, of Pembroke Pines, Florida, saved a Miami police officer from assault when the driver of a taxi pulled over by the officer opened fire in April 2015.

EVEN THOUGH IT’S LATE DECEMBER, IT’S STILL SWELTERING IN FLORIDA

It’s not feeling a lot like Christmas across South Florida. In fact, it’s sunny, hot and humid. Miami shattered a record Monday with a high temperature of 86 degrees. A confluence of unlucky weather is to blame. Cold fronts that typically cool off the area are fizzling before they arrive. And, to the south, a high pressure ridge keeps pushing along warm air from the tropics.

 

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