New study: Working mom’s get shorted in Florida

Florida received a “D” grade for job services provided to new and expecting parents according to national analysis of employment law by the National Partnership for Women and Families.

The analysis entitled Expecting Better: A State by State Analysis of Laws That Help Expecting and New Parents looked at how state laws expanded on the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

They assessed laws pertaining to sick, maternity, family and medical leave as well as whether or not this leave could be used to care for family members, temporary disability accommodations for pregnant workers and rights for nursing mothers on the job.

Of the 50 states analyzed, only California received an A grade. More than half of states received less than a C.

Sadie Kliner is a representative with the partnership. She said it’s not surprising that states fell short.

“We can’t pretend to know why they don’t take action on these policies,” she said. “What we do know is [workers] need more protections both for their health and well-being and the health of new children.”

But FMLA does provide workers across the nation with support.

Federal law requires that all private-sector companies with at least 50 employees, all government jobs at every level and all schools provide certain unpaid leave options to workers that have worked for them for at least 12 months.

Read the full article in the Aug. 11 issue of Navarre Press. Click HERE to subscribe for as little as $38 per year.

Soon-to-be mom Megan Hegenbart works in retail where she is on her feet most of her shift. She said she was surprised that Florida received a "D" grade considering how flexible her employer has been with her.

Soon-to-be mom Megan Hegenbart works in retail where she is on her feet most of her shift. She said she was surprised that Florida received a “D” grade considering how flexible her employer has been with her.

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