States take aim at setting pitch count limits

Concerns are on the rise over pitch counts in baseball but Navarre pitcher Tyler Rebber will tell you it’s the last thing on his mind when he is in a game.

“I try to be tougher than my body can handle,” Rebber said. “I just throw until I can’t anymore.”

That mentality of the Raiders senior isn’t anything new. Athletes always push themselves to the limit even when their bodies are screaming at them to do otherwise.

It might not always result in injury, but most of the time, athletes pay the price in some way.

“It’s dead. That is how my arm feels after a game,” Rebber said. It takes about four or five days for it to recover.”

Rebber has never exceeded the recommended limit of 105 and has never suffered a serious arm injury but plenty of other young pitchers have over the course of their careers and a push is in progress to reverse the alarming trend.

Limiting pitch counts seems to be the answer, according to Dr. Steve Jordan, an orthopedic surgeon at the Andrews Institute in Gulf Breeze.

“Studies and research have been done, including a lot through Andrews, and they have shown that excess pitch counts are a very modifiable risk factor,” Jordan said. “Some studies have shown that keeping pitch counts down means athletes have five to seven times less of a risk of injury.”

Setting a limit

Only three states have a pitch count limit in place, although it appears more are set to follow the lead of Colorado, Kentucky and Vermont.

Alabama has a limit of 120 pitches in place for 2017 while Minnesota, Arizona and Wisconsin are considering it for next year with Oklahoma, Texas, Washington, New York and Illinois likely to do the same in the near future.

Florida does not have a pitch count limit but does have an inning limit of 10. He can’t throw in more than 14 innings in a week.

Read more  in the June 30 edition of Navarre Press or subscribe online here.

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